Kim Saul

Kim Saul

I have lived in Belton all my life, and went to the village School in the mid 60's then I went to Lothingland secondary Modern in Lound, Suffolk, I now work in Norwich. My interests are Photography and Music.

Digging for victory

Digging for victory

  Return to Menu page Digging for victory. “Digging for Victory” was the well published slogan during WW2 to encourage the British to grow more food to supplement the meagre rations available. My father took this very much to heart and expanded our already good sized garden at Hill Cottages on Sandy Lane by opening up an equally generous sized new plot over the hedge,onto what was a portion of Belton Common. which contained among other varieties Mirabelle Plum.   This ground I don’t think had been cultivated since the creation! It consisted of tussocky grass and bracken and just […]

Belton book

Belton author Miss Dorothy Smith with her book in 1992

Return to Menu page Belton book – by Dorothy Smith In January 1992 – just a mere two weeks after its publication a book on the history of Belton has already sold more than two hundred copies. Such a demand from the people who want to read about the Suffolk village in the days before it was annexed by Norfolk and became a dormitory for Gt. Yarmouth. The author, Dorothy Smith then 88 is one person who regrets the change. She is a descendant of he Farman family which lived in the village for five generations, but her book is […]

Renovation of St. Johns farmhouse

Renovation of St. Johns farmhouse

Return to Menu page St. Johns farm house is a beautiful thatched building with history stretching back four centuries and is being given a much needed reed re-topping. St. Johns farm house is one of only three thatched buildings left in Belton. St. Johns farmhouse has long been a busy, bustling village home. It has been in Janet McManus’ family since her parents Roger & Annie Botwright bought it in 1953, and worked the land as farmers. There is no farm to tend to these days but, some traditions still carry favour, an the farmhouse has recently ben re-thatched using […]

Belton war dead from the first World War

Belton war dead from the first World War

Return to Menu page After one hundred years  we commemorate the Glorious dead from Belton. World War One. Alfred John Arrowsmith – Born in 1886 in Lowestoft  – (Rank) Corporal – The Royal Norfolk Regiment  – killed in action on the 9th March 1918 in France/Flanders, commemorated in ANZAC Cemetery Sailly – Sur – Lalys. Ernest Charles Brooks –  Born in Belton Suffolk – (Rank) Private – Suffolk Regiment –  Killed in Action on the 13th September 1916 in France/Flanders, commemorated in the THIEPVAL Memorial on the Somme. George Alfred Saul – Born in Belton Suffolk – (Rank) Private – Queen’s (Royal […]

Pub of the week – Norwich Evening News (10-10-2014)

Landlady Vicky Applegate, at the Railway Tavern Belton

Return to Menu page Friendship and Generosity keep pub at the heart of community The Railway Tavern in Belton Faced with changing customer habits, many traditional inns are being transformed into gastro – pubs in order to stay in business. As a result is, in part, why walking into the Railway Tavern in Belton near Great Yarmouth, feels like stepping back into a truly traditional community pub. It has been an inn since the mid-1800’s and without making any drastic changes to what is on offer, it continues to attract the locals and stand its ground as a village pub. Current Landlady Vicky Applegate […]

Good Friday trek to Old Mother Brown’s

Children on the traditional Good Friday walk to Old Mother Brown's at Burgh Castle in 1958

  Return to Menu page Good Friday trek to Old Mother Brown’s In the Scarfe is Nora Haggett of Manor Road Gorleston, with her sister and friends. note the cases for carrying ginger pop and buns to sustain the walkers On Good Friday Children from all over Gorleston & Gt. Yarmouth used to make the long trek to Burgh Castle to pay homage to Old Mother Brown. The picture above shows some of the Children who made the Good Friday pilgrimage in 1958 with just one mile to go. Clifford Temple who used to live in Nelson Road North vividly remembered […]

Paper boy Ted Kemp

Mr Ted Kemp in 1993 with his trade bike

Return to Menu page Paper ‘boy’ Ted Kemp still going strong at 80 in 1993   Ted Kemp celebrating his 80th birthday in style after being congratulated for being the longest serving paper boy in Norfolk. Ted has been bringing the news to people around Great Yarmouth for 70 years in a business which he runs from his garage. and while younger paperboys may come and go on their flashy mountain bikes Ted remains a familiar face to hundreds of customers as he makes rounds on his sturdy trade bike. Ted of St. Johns Road, Belton  started delivering papers at […]

Belton Dance Club

Belton dance club in the 1920's

Return to Menu page Late – in – life dancer got in the swim. Photograph supplied by Mr Charles Burrage of Freethorpe. Back in the 1920’s dancing was one of the favourite pastimes and the Belton Dance Club used to meet once a week to practice their ballroom steps. The large hall behind the Kings Head at Belton was where they used to meet. This photograph was taken outside the hall in 1923. Mr Burrage’s parents were members of the club and they can be seen in the middle row, the second and third from the left. Mr Burrage senior […]

Scheme that founded in the cut

Crossing Point.
Reedham Ferry in the 1950's

Return to Menu page Haddiscoe cut Taken from the Great Yarmouth Mercury (Through the Port hole) by Peggotty 1998 Crossing point: A bygone scene at Haddiscoe in the 1930’s. The arrangement to cross the river in those days could not possibly have coped with the traffic on the busy A143. The waterways of Broadland meander through the flat landscape, in many places they scarcely have any sense of direction as they follow their course. All except one, that is, which is straight as an arrow shaft along its entire length, because it is man – made  when Mr & Mrs Peggotty flew […]

Starting life on the right line

Starting life on the right line

Return to Menu page Baby born on the right side of the track Additional article to “A sweep as lucky could be” In the autumn – winter of 1889 one of the most bizarre births ever recorded took place at Belton. The tragic and Reginald Hubert Burrage. Certainly the unusual arrival into the world of baby Burrage was a major talking point, not only in the villages whose residents featured in the inquiries about him, but also among the gossiping townsfolk of Great Yarmouth and Gorleston. For the baby was born as his mother was dying alone in the darkness and lying beside a […]